Over-zealous parking wardens are 'killing' Oswestry town centre

Reporter:

Emily Davies

Over-zealous parking wardens are “killing” Oswestry town centre, according to one resident.

Zoe Calloway had parked in the ‘loading only’ area of Cross Street last Tuesday morning with a car filled with items to drop off at the Help the Aged shop on Bailey Street.

But despite leaving her vehicle for only five minutes while she checked if the shop was open, she received a ticket for parking illegally.

She said: “I’ve lived in Oswestry my whole life, but this is ridiculous.

“This is why the town is dying – people can’t access the town centre.”

The 32-year-old continued: “The charity shops say they don’t like you to leave items outside, so I went to check what time the shop opened. I came back to find I’d got a ticket – it wasn’t even 9am.

“I parked there because you’re not supposed to drive up Bailey Street and I like to support the charity shops instead of throwing things away.

“But this has made me so cross.

“How do the parking wardens know if someone has gone to pick something up?”

Zoe said she intends to appeal the fine: “I’m not paying it – I don’t think I should.”

Grant Tunnadine, Shropshire Council’s investigation, compliance and intervention team manager, said: “Loading bays are primarily intended to assist businesses with their deliveries to and from their premises, but can also be used by any motorist where they have a genuine need to load heavy or bulky items.

“It is therefore essential these bays are used appropriately by all motorists, otherwise commercial vehicles, including HGVs, find it increasingly difficult to make their deliveries, adding to the issues faced by local businesses as well as adding to local traffic congestion.

“If a motorist wishes to use a loading bay to load or unload heavy or bulky items, then they should do so in a timely and continuous manner, in a bay adjacent to or close to the location where the loading or unloading is to take place. 

“If these simple practices are being adhered to, then there will be little need for a civil enforcement officer to issue a Penalty Charge Notice (PCN), as the observation they undertake of the vehicle should reveal the motorist is using the bay for this particular use.

“If a PCN is issued because of an unforeseen delay experienced by the motorist, then a PCN can be challenged by following the instructions given with the PCN.”

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